HIV-1 subtypes and profiles of resistance to protease inhibitors in the Marajo Archipelago (Brazilian Amazon region)

Authors

  • Mike Barbosa dos Santos Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Samantha Assis Assis-Aguiar Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Samara T. Monteiro-Gomes Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Maria A. Freitas-Queiroz Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Felipe Bonfim-Freitas Instituto Evandro Chagas, Sessão de Virologia, BR-316, Levil6andia, 67.030-000, Ananindeua, Para, Brasil
  • Izaura M. V. Cayres-Vallinoto Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Marluísa O. Guimarães-Ishak Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Ricardo Ishak Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil
  • Antonio C. Rosario-Vallinoto Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Ciências Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Guama, 66.075-110, Belem, Para, Brasil https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1135-6507

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54034/mic.e1173

Keywords:

HIV-1, subtypes, mutation, resistance, Marajo Island

Abstract

The Marajo Archipelago, located in the rural area of ​​the state of Para (Amazon region of Brazil), is the region with the lowest index of human development in the country, presenting poor health services, which makes adequate epidemiological surveillance of HIV-1 infection difficult. After a serological screening enrolling 1,877 samples, three samples were diagnosed with HIV-1 and the pro gene was sequenced to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations to protease inhibitors. Molecular analyses revealed, for the first time in the region of Marajo Island, the occurrence of HIV-1 subtypes B and D, as well as the presence of transmitted high and intermediate protease inhibitors resistance mutations. The results emphasize the importance of ongoing molecular epidemiological surveillance studies in the Brazilian Amazon region because antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations may limit treatment options, and the presence of certain subtypes seems to influence the progression to AIDS, particularly in areas where the entry and spread of the virus can be facilitated by socio-demographic problems that expose the population to sexually transmitted infections.

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Published

2021-09-13

How to Cite

Barbosa dos Santos, M., Assis-Aguiar, S. A., Monteiro-Gomes, S. T., Freitas-Queiroz, M. A., Bonfim-Freitas, F., Cayres-Vallinoto, I. M. V., Guimarães-Ishak, M. O., Ishak, R., & Rosario-Vallinoto, A. C. (2021). HIV-1 subtypes and profiles of resistance to protease inhibitors in the Marajo Archipelago (Brazilian Amazon region). Microbes, Infection and Chemotherapy, 1, e1173. https://doi.org/10.54034/mic.e1173

Issue

Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCH